Half empty or half full

Our perspectives change when our environment changes. We tighten our grip during bad times and we loosen it during the good times. But why let recessions, and bubbles, and stock prices, and holiday seasons dictate when we are going to be generous?

We have to take care of our survival: food, water, shelter, clothing. I get that. But most of us who are reading this are not worried about where their next meal is going to come from. Once we have taken care of our survival, we need to find ways to be generous with our money, time, and talents. Paradoxically, it’s giving these finite resources away that creates abundance. (The “not-so secret” secret: The more you give, the more you get.)

Practicing generosity is a skill. It doesn’t suddenly happen when you finally make it. Money amplifies behavior, it doesn’t change it. A generous person becomes extremely generous when she makes millions. (It’s the same with greed.) Philanthropy isn’t reserved for billionaires. Making a difference or changing someone for the better is for anyone who wants to care.

But some people will insist on checking under every rock hoping to find answers that are right in front of them. I think we can do better. Spend less time looking for a purpose and instead focus on fulfilling a purpose.

[What am I going to do with what I have been given? Am I wasting this opportunity? These are better questions to ask yourself than spending time thinking about what’s in your cup.]

Published by

Josh Allred

Professional blogger. Impresario. Founder of Pivot Adventure Co.